Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Waiting on Wednesday #124: Roses and Rot by Kat Howard


"Waiting on Wednesday" is a weekly event hosted by Jill over at Breaking the Spine where we spotlight upcoming releases we are eagerly anticipating.

Synopsis from Goodreads:

Imogen and her sister Marin have escaped their cruel mother to attend a prestigious artists’ retreat, but soon learn that living in a fairy tale requires sacrifices, be it art or love in this haunting debut fantasy novel from “a remarkable young writer” (Neil Gaiman).

What would you sacrifice in the name of success? How much does an artist need to give up to create great art?

Imogen has grown up reading fairy tales about mothers who die and make way for cruel stepmothers. As a child, she used to lie in bed wishing that her life would become one of these tragic fairy tales because she couldn’t imagine how a stepmother could be worse than her mother now. As adults, Imogen and her sister Marin are accepted to an elite post-grad arts program—Imogen as a writer and Marin as a dancer. Soon enough, though, they realize that there’s more to the school than meets the eye. Imogen might be living in the fairy tale she’s dreamed about as a child, but it’s one that will pit her against Marin if she decides to escape her past to find her heart’s desire.


Why am I waiting on this book? Well, the fairy tale theme is a big part of why I'm waiting on it. I love fairy tales and retellings. I like the idea of this one. Sounds a little like "Be careful what you wish for" too. And then there is the fact that Neil Gaiman thinks that the writer is a "remarkable young writer." I like his writing and if he likes their writing, there is a good chance I will too.

What book are you waiting on this week? Share it or a link in the comments so we can check it out and maybe add it to our ever-growing TBR lists. Thanks for coming by!

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Teaser Tuesday: The Girl from Everywhere by Heidi Heilig


Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme hosted by Miz B of A Daily Rhythm
Anyone can participate, just do the following:
  • Grab your current read and open to a random page
  • Share two (2) "teaser" sentences from somewhere on that page.
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (Make sure what you share doesn't give too much away! You don't want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title and the author so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR lists if they like your teasers.

Expected publication:
February 16th 2016 by Greenwillow Books

"Kashmir was right about the captain; when he wanted something he did not stop until he had it. No matter what it cost. No matter who it hurt."
~ 2% on my Kindle

What's your teaser this week? Share it or a link in the comments so we can check it out. Thanks for coming by!


Friday, February 5, 2016

Quickie Review: Unicorn vs. Goblins by Dana Simpson

Unicorn vs. Goblins (Heavenly Nostrils, #3)Unicorn vs. Goblins by Dana Simpson
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

This is the third book in the Heavenly Nostrils series. It's a cute collection of humorous comic strips. The primary audience is children, but there is a lot of humor that will also appeal to adults. It follows the adventures of Phoebe and her unicorn friend, Marigold, through the summer and into the school year. Phoebe is in elementary school. The book hits on some key issues: making friends at camp, having a frenemy, and being picked last for a team among others. One of my favorite bits was one involving Marigold, tacos, and the Lake Monster at summer camp.

I expected more about Goblins than there was. And I thought some of it was a little more repetitive than the last 2 books. As a result, I gave this collection 3.5 stars instead of 4 this time around. It's still a good book. And it's funny. I just didn't enjoy it quite as much as the first two. That being said, perhaps kids would rate it differently.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.


View all my reviews

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Throwback Thursday: Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

When Clay wanders into Mr. Penumbra's 24 Hour Bookstore on an impulse after seeing the help wanted sign in the window, Mr. Penumbra asks, "What do you seek in these shelves?" (p.8) That sounds likeMr_Penumbra an excellent question for the beginning of a quest. And basically, Clay embarks upon a quest of sorts after getting hired. He is introduced by Penumbra to his unusual bookstore with its small collection of more recent books and its stories high collection of what Clay starts to call the wayback list and its unusual clientele.
Clay and his friends begin to work on the mystery of the books and the clientele and just what is it that they are getting out of these books that appear to be in code. This leads them from the bookstore to Google to New York City and back as they attempt to find out just what's going on.
I love books about bookstores and the people that inhabit them. This book was no exception. I liked the bit about the secret society trying to decode the books. And I liked the way Clay and his friends work together to try and solve the mystery of what's in the books. Someone remarked that they thought Clay had it too easy in his quest, and maybe it could be a little true, but I prefer to think he is just good at using the resources and contacts he has access to.
Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan came out in October 2012. I listened to the unabridged audiobook. It was great except for the part where he is listening to an audiobook inside the book. I just couldn't make out what was being said, but that could be my ears and fine for most people as I am hard of hearing. I think I might read this book again in the future as opposed to listening to it. Might give me a slightly different take on things. Still, I would expect my overall view to be positive as it is now after listening to the book.
I give this book 4 stars. The book is worth a read. It's fun to read and see where they are going as they try to solve the mystery of the books and the clientele that make up the secret society that reads them. The ending is a little philosophical. And there is a long epilog,  but it's an interesting way to wrap things up.  

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Waiting on Wednesday #123: Brotherhood of the Wheel by R.S. Belcher


"Waiting on Wednesday" is a weekly event hosted by Jill over at Breaking the Spine where we spotlight upcoming releases we are eagerly anticipating.

In the same world as Nightwise, comes a new book March 1, 2016, Brotherhood of the Wheel by R.S. Belcher.

Synopsis from Goodreads.com:

A unique new urban fantasy by the author of The Six-Gun Tarot, exploring the haunted byways and truck stops of the U.S. Interstate Highway System
In 1119 A.D., a group of nine crusaders became known as the Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon--a militant monastic order charged with protecting pilgrims and caravans traveling on the roads to and from the Holy Land. In time, the Knights Templar would grow in power and, ultimately, be laid low. But a small offshoot of the Templars endures and have returned to the order's original mission: to defend the roads of the world and guard those who travel on them.

Theirs is a secret line of knights: truckers, bikers, taxi hacks, state troopers, bus drivers, RV gypsies--any of the folks who live and work on the asphalt arteries of America. They call themselves the Brotherhood of the Wheel.

Jimmy Aussapile is one such knight. He's driving a big rig down South when a promise to a ghostly hitchhiker sets him on a quest to find out the terrible truth behind a string of children gone missing all across the country. The road leads him to Lovina Hewitt, a skeptical Louisiana State Police investigator working the same case and, eventually, to a forgotten town that's not on any map--and to the secret behind the eerie Black-Eyed Kids said to prowl the highways.


Why am I waiting on this book? Well, I've enjoyed reading The Six-Gun Tarot and Nightwise by the same author. And RT magazine gives it 4 1/2 stars. Looks like it's going to be a good dark urban fantasy book.

What book are you waiting on this week? Share it or a link in the comments so we can check it out.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Teaser Tuesday: Unicorn vs. Goblins by Dana Simpson


Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme hosted by Miz B of A Daily Rhythm
Anyone can participate, just do the following:
  • Grab your current read and open to a random page
  • Share two (2) "teaser" sentences from somewhere on that page.
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (Make sure what you share doesn't give too much away! You don't want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title and the author so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR lists if they like your teasers.

Expected publication:
 February 23rd 2016
by Andrews McMeel Publishing
The Unicorn regarding the camp counselor's description of the Monster that Lives in the Lake: "I met him! He was  hungry, but I brought him some tacos and he is full now. Nice Fellow!"

p. 32 in Unicorn vs. Goblins by Dana Simpson (Heavenly Nostrils #3) It's a collection of comic strips.

It's supposed to be for kids, but I love the humor in the series. The forward is done by Cory Doctorow and his daughter.

What's your teaser this week? Share it or a link in the comments so we can check it out. Thanks for coming by!


Friday, January 29, 2016

Review: The Assimilated Cuban's Guide to Quantum Santeria by Carlos Hernandez

The Assimilated Cuban's Guide to Quantum Santeria is a 4 star collection of science fiction and fantasy short stories by Carlos Hernandez.

The topics of the stories are varied and most have a Cuban as the lead character. From the ghost of a man's mother living in a bullet hole in a wall, to a selkie-like creature, to people masquerading as robotic pandas the book is full of interesting stories. The last story in the book is the one that gives the book it's title. It wasn't my favorite, but it shows that Santeria is an adaptable religion if nothing else.

Most of the stories have some humor to them as well as being creative. Some of the stories end kind of abruptly, but it works for them. They are short stories after all and not novellas.

I would recommend this collection for people who enjoy their science fiction and fantasy with a dash of humor and an interesting cultural perspective.

I gave this book 4 stars for the quality of the writing and because I enjoyed it. It's due out February 15, 2016 from Rosarium Publishing.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.